Originally posted on March 30, 2010.

In February 2009, the White House predicted that the so-called “stimulus” would create thousands of jobs in every state in 2010. Unfortunately, 49 out of 50 states have yet to see any positive job growth this year. In February 2010, the jobless rate rose in 27 states. The chart below shows the White House’s predicted change of jobs through December 2010 compared to the actual change in jobs through February 2010.

State             Administration Forecast of Change in Jobs       Actual Change in Jobs

Alabama              +52,000                                                         -58,000
Alaska                  +8,000                                                           +900
Arizona                +70,000                                                        -100,400
Arkansas              +31,000                                                        -28,700
California            +396,000                                                       -586,300
Colorado              +59,000                                                        -83,900
Connecticut         +41,000                                                         -45,400
Delaware              +11,000                                                         -14,300
District of Columbia    +12,000                                                 +1,600
Florida                +206,000                                                         -211,500
Georgia              +106,000                                                         -136,200
Hawaii                 +15,000                                                          -15,600
Idaho                   +17,000                                                         -19,500
Illinois                 +148,000                                                        -192,200
Indiana                +75,000                                                         -76,700
Iowa                     +37,000                                                         -33,600
Kansas                 +33,000                                                          -45,900
Kentucky              +48,000                                                        -38,400
Louisiana             +50,000                                                        -36,700
Maine                   +15,000                                                        -12,200
Maryland              +66,000                                                       -68,300
Massachusetts     +79,000                                                       -79,900
Michigan              +109,000                                                     -112,000
Minnesota            +66,000                                                       -62,300
Mississippi           +30,000                                                       -26,500
Missouri               +69,000                                                       -72,600
Montana              +11,000                                                       -9,200
Nebraska             +23,000                                                       -21,700
Nevada                 +34,000                                                       -61,600
New Hampshire  +16,000                                                        -2,800
New Jersey          +100,000                                                     -81,600
New Mexico       +22,000                                                         -21,200
New York            +215,000                                                      -163,300
North Carolina  +105,000                                                       -94,100
North Dakota    +8,000                                                            -200
Ohio                  +133,000                                                       -177,900
Oklahoma        +40,000                                                          -52,900
Oregon              +44,000                                                         -53,100
Pennsylvania    +143,000                                                        -141,100
Rhode Island    +12,000                                                          -13,000
South Carolina  +50,000                                                        -22,800
South Dakota    +10,000                                                         -8,500
Tennessee       +70,000                                                           -81,300
Texas               +269,000                                                        -236,800
Utah                 +32,000                                                           -29,900
Vermont         +8,000                                                               -3,900
Virginia            +93,000                                                           -100,700
Washington     +75,000                                                           -89,800
West Virginia   +20,000                                                           -22,200
Wisconsin       +70,000                                                            -95,500
Wyoming         +8,000                                                              -13,000

According to the data, only Alaska and the District of Columbia have had a modest increase in employment. However, the primary reason for the increase in jobs in the District of Columbia is the growth of federal government employment. With a high private-sector unemployment rate, federal employment growth trend is unsustainable. CBS News reports that employment in the executive branch is expected to rapidly increase by the end of 2010,

Executive branch employment – 1.98 million in 2009, excluding the Postal Service and the Defense Department – is set to increase by 15.6 percent for the 2010 fiscal year.

Fifteen states currently have double-digits unemployment rates. The Labor Department statisticsshow the states with the highest unemployment rates,

Behind Michigan [14.1 percent], Nevada had the second highest jobless rate in the country with 13.2 percent, followed by Rhode Island (12.7 percent), California (12.5 percent), South Carolina (12.5 percent) and Florida.

The New York Times reports that some states have hit their highest jobless rate since those states began tracking records,

Florida, Nevada, Georgia and North Carolina were each at their highest jobless rates on record.

Due to the White House’s failed economic experiments, entrepreneurs in the private sector often lack the means to create new jobs. According to the “stimulus” legislation, an executive branch bureaucrat has the right to take money from the private sector in the form of taxes and redistribute it based on an imperfect political decision matrix. Which begs the question– is an executive branch bureaucrat the right person to invest someone else’s money? Or will he want to see someone else’s money go to his district before elections at the expense of others? As Dick Armey says, “No one spends someone else’s money as wisely as he spends his own.”  The White House continues to claim that the “stimulus” has worked and prevented another Great Depression. In reality, the “stimulus” has been a remarkable failure and has cost the majority of US states thousands of jobs.

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